Sunday, 20 September 2015


My Adventures With Fedora 

I recently decided to undertake a new adventure with Linux. During the last month I have
become increasingly frustrated with my Windows installations,
    
I have used Windows 7 as my main Operating System for a few years and it has served me well. However I decided to make the switch to Open Source completely and so on one afternoon I formatted my Windows 7 setup and installed a fresh Fedora 21 setup. The reasoning were simple my system was grinding to a halt, was clogged up with malware + various Microsoft services running in the background the majority of which I had no idea of what they were actually doing so I took the plunge.

Two months later I am using the Fedora machine to write this blog post I will be showing you guys some post installation tweaks and configurations. Fedora for myself has been a solid distribution I have enjoyed my time with it immensely and it has handled the majority of tasks that I undertook on my Windows Setup. I hope you find this guide useful. 
How to install Fedora 21: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/Fedora/21/pdf/Installation_Guide/Fedora-21-Installation_Guide-en-US.pdf 

Ok Great so now you have a clean install of fedora it's now time to get the system fully updated:
This is achieved by typing the command shown below in a terminal window remember because you are performing an administrative task you will be prompted for your root password. Which you should of configured during installation of Fedora. 



Configure The Gnome Desktop environment: for my Fedora setup I have added a Dock at the bottom of the screen which is similar to Mac OS X layout. 

 You can use the dock to add shortcuts to your favorite / most used applications for quick access, 

Install Gnome Tweak Tool: The default GUI used by Fedora 21 is GNOME 3 to customize and make changes to the desktop layout we have to install the Gnome Tweak Tool Application as shown below.

 You can now open the Gnome tweak tool from *applications* from here you can configure various GUI options. 

 

Install Gnome Shell Extensions and add Dock: You can install various Gnome Shell Extensions and Add-ons by visiting the following site: https://extensions.gnome.org/

To install the Dock search for and  select the dash to Dock application:

To access various options including orientation of the dock right click on the dock.


Ok so now you have a freshly updated system with a Dock setup for easy access. Next I will show you how to add more repositories to the system which enables us to install and access a greater variety of software.

Enable RPM Fusion Repo:To enable the RPM fusion repository open up terminal and run the following command:

su -c 'yum -y install http://download1.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-21.noarch.rpm'

su -c 'yum -y install http://download1.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/rpmfusion-nonfree-release-21.noarch.rpm'
 To Be Continued.........

Sunday, 28 June 2015



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Server Setup Initial Shortcuts:

howdy guys today I am going to show you some shortcuts on setting up a Centos Server. Please be aware that this will be a ongoing set of tutorials so please feel free to check back. I will keep the notes brief and I will assume that you already have installed the O/S to the hard disk. So without further ado let's get down to business.


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Configure the network: nmtui

Add DNS settings: /etc/resolv.conf add you DNS server details.

Show I.P address details: ip addr show eth0

Install net tools: yum install net-tools

Another way of displaying ip details: ipconfig ( install net-tools)

Install vim: yum install vim

[ Change System Hostname] - vim / etc/hostname

Check the hostname - echo $HOSTNAME

 

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[Change Keyboard language and locale]

localectl status
localectl list-locales
localectl set-keymap uk
yum install system-config keyboard


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[Update The System]

  yum update && yum upgrade

[ Add Epel Repository for extra software

sudo yum install epel-release 

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Stayed tuned for part 2

Wednesday, 22 April 2015


 


Centos 7 How To Change Runlevel

 On today's post I am going to walk you guys through the process of changing run-levels. This is ideal for situations for example where have a Centos installation that boots up into a graphical user interface and you wish to boot into Command Line only. So let's get down to business and do this :)


Checking The Current Runlevel

 You can still use the command "runlevel" to check the current run-level however here are two more ways to achieve the same goal.

 systemctl get-default

ll /etc/systemd/system/default.target


 Output Showing Current Runlevel:



 So graphical.target is my current runlevel this makes sense as I am running the Gnome desktop environment.

Before we go ahead and change the current runlevel we need will need to check out the available targets. We do this by issusing the following command:

# systemctl list-units --type=target




We will now go ahead and change the default runlevel to a runlevel3 
( this is will run nothing but a multi-user.target) 

We achieve this by issuing the following command:

# systemctl set-default multi-user.target 

We now confirm the changes / confirm the default runlevel:

# systemctl get-default

We should be now presented with the following as output indicating that the default runlevel has changed.

 multi-user.target
 Awesome stuff :) we have changed the runlevel all we need to do now is to reboot the system and check out our new runlevel in action:

reboot